Text

Fast & Furious 6 (PG-13)

Fast 6 (Poster)

Director: Justin Lin
Writer: Chris Morgan
Runtime: 2 hr. 10 min.
Released: May 24, 2013
Universal Pictures

Perhaps I’ve no right reviewing the sixth movie in a series when I’m only acquainted with One through Three. I am literally so lost at the beginning of this film I can’t even tell you.

I want to give it a shot. I’ve heard from several reliable sources that it’s “not as bad as you’d think.”

I’…

View On WordPress

Text

Diner (Poster)

You gotta love a movie that holds up.

Not much needs to be said.

Written and directed by Barry Levinson, nominated for Best Screenplay and set in Baltimore 1959.

I’ll try not to spoil anything, because if you like movies and haven’t seen this gem, you must catch it soon. It’s funny, poignant and has a spectacular cast.

I can’t get enough of Paul Reiser’s character, Modell. Good Golly he’s funny.

View On WordPress

Photo

The Wolverine (PG-13)

Director: James Mangold Writers: Mark Bomback (screenplay) & Scott Frank (screenplay) Runtime: 2 hr. 16 min.

Photo

On the red carpet (at TCL Chinese Theatre)

Photo

I built this doggy bed/side table for my mother a couple weeks ago (at Lovelette Home)

Photo

Out of all Patty’s husbands, John’s my favorite. And he lacks a shoe horn! So I touched up my old one for him. @houstonlover

Photo

Doesn’t get much more “Steve” than this. (at Lovelette Home)

Photo

Repainting took way longer than expected, but I think it came out lovely, yes? (at Lovelette Home)

Photo

Years ago, upon request, my father lugged this back from a business trip to Hawaii. After over a decade of movement from one safe location to another, I’ve finally gotten it on the wall. And only just now realize how scary it’s going to be in the middle of the night. (at Lovelette Home)

Photo

The finished folded Murphy desk, with a freshly cut looking glass. (at Lovelette Home)

Photo

Day drinking cokes (at Lovelette Home)

Photo

Needed a place to keep my magnifying glass, so I built this Murphy desk (at Lovelette Home)

Photo
A watch given to me by Ambassador Harry Thomas, United States Ambassador to the Philippines. 
(More on watches soon!)

A watch given to me by Ambassador Harry Thomas, United States Ambassador to the Philippines. 

(More on watches soon!)

Photo
Shoes to Booze In
           Your query will be met with a request for your ID (and most likely laughter,) if you order a drink while lights are flashing from the heels of your sneakers.  
           Seriously though, you can’t order an old-fashioned while sporting your original Air Jordan’s, without expecting at least a slight snicker from the bartender.
            When you reach that incredibly thirsty age, don’t forget to renew your driver’s license and, if necessary, update your shoe selection. What are the bare essentials for the twenty-year-old man? Well for most, it’s the first year they start to get serious about their future – meaning job interviews, internships, etc. – making formal shoes a necessity.
            I checked around with male relatives and friends and asked them what they thought the bare minimum was for men of the legal drinking age. Surprisingly, the highest answer came from the least likely source: a twenty two year old who put himself through college and is completely self-sustained monetarily. He said seven. One pair of black formal shoes, one brown, one pair workout/running shoes, one pair of nicer or more formal sneakers, one pair of cheap sandals, one pair of all-weather boots and one pair of casually formal shoes (like Sperry’s, boat shoes or loafers.)
            Most of my friends sided with my father, who thought five pairs would suffice. He didn’t think sandals or nice sneakers were a necessity for a 21 year old. The lowest answer I received was two: one pair of casually formal shoes (he specifically cited Toms), and a pair of formal black shoes. But I simply can’t see the devil’s advocate saying one could get by with any less than three. I’d add the sneakers.
            But the overwhelming majority thought five pairs. And I’m inclined to agree. Taking all of the answers into consideration, I’d say it’s a fair compromise.
            So for your typical 21 year old, the bare minimum is five pairs: Black formal shoes, casually formal shoes, sneakers, all-weather boots and sandals.
             I’m not partial towards puddle splashing or anything, but one needs boots to keep the rest of their collection safe against the elements. I never publicly wear sandals unless standing on a beach, but I still need them for use as shower shoes. A pair of cheap ones can cost as little as five to ten dollars. And I’m nearly positive you’ll end up on a beach at some point.
            Five might be the minimum, but I still like the answer from my financially independent friend (after all if he can afford it, almost everybody else should be able to). That’s not to say you should keep your selection small. If you have the resources, by all means splurge a little. I have over twenty pairs of shoes, so who am I to encourage a limit?

Shoes to Booze In

           Your query will be met with a request for your ID (and most likely laughter,) if you order a drink while lights are flashing from the heels of your sneakers.  

           Seriously though, you can’t order an old-fashioned while sporting your original Air Jordan’s, without expecting at least a slight snicker from the bartender.

            When you reach that incredibly thirsty age, don’t forget to renew your driver’s license and, if necessary, update your shoe selection. What are the bare essentials for the twenty-year-old man? Well for most, it’s the first year they start to get serious about their future – meaning job interviews, internships, etc. – making formal shoes a necessity.

            I checked around with male relatives and friends and asked them what they thought the bare minimum was for men of the legal drinking age. Surprisingly, the highest answer came from the least likely source: a twenty two year old who put himself through college and is completely self-sustained monetarily. He said seven. One pair of black formal shoes, one brown, one pair workout/running shoes, one pair of nicer or more formal sneakers, one pair of cheap sandals, one pair of all-weather boots and one pair of casually formal shoes (like Sperry’s, boat shoes or loafers.)

            Most of my friends sided with my father, who thought five pairs would suffice. He didn’t think sandals or nice sneakers were a necessity for a 21 year old. The lowest answer I received was two: one pair of casually formal shoes (he specifically cited Toms), and a pair of formal black shoes. But I simply can’t see the devil’s advocate saying one could get by with any less than three. I’d add the sneakers.

            But the overwhelming majority thought five pairs. And I’m inclined to agree. Taking all of the answers into consideration, I’d say it’s a fair compromise.

            So for your typical 21 year old, the bare minimum is five pairs: Black formal shoes, casually formal shoes, sneakers, all-weather boots and sandals.

             I’m not partial towards puddle splashing or anything, but one needs boots to keep the rest of their collection safe against the elements. I never publicly wear sandals unless standing on a beach, but I still need them for use as shower shoes. A pair of cheap ones can cost as little as five to ten dollars. And I’m nearly positive you’ll end up on a beach at some point.

            Five might be the minimum, but I still like the answer from my financially independent friend (after all if he can afford it, almost everybody else should be able to). That’s not to say you should keep your selection small. If you have the resources, by all means splurge a little. I have over twenty pairs of shoes, so who am I to encourage a limit?

Photo
The Power of a Bowtie
Recently I heard about a guy who wore a bowtie almost every single day of his college career. It was his trademark, and I wish I had thought of it first.
People are nicer to you if you’re wearing a bowtie. Plain and simple.
Wearing one for the first time the other day, sixty-one different individuals said something nice about my appearance. About a third of them were strangers. Most made a direct reference to my choice in neckware. But every single one of them greeted me with a big smile.
As I was leaving a building, a girl with rainbow hair caught my eye. I could tell she had been staring and when I turned to look at her, she grinned and called out, “Bowties are cool!” I didn’t know whether to thank her or agree so I just chuckled and dipped out the door.
While I was picking up a package, the woman behind the desk told me how much she liked my tie. She said, “it gave me personality.” I could have been the biggest asshole she’d ever met, but it didn’t matter – I was wearing a bowtie.
At one point I passed a plot where the skeleton of a building stood. From the metal girders where they sat with their lunches, a group of female construction workers sent a chorus of catcalls hurtling in my direction. One of them let out a long, old-fashioned whistle.
Okay, maybe that’s stretching the truth a bit. But the point is that bowties surround you with an aura that catches the eye of everyone nearby. For some reason, they all want to know why you’re wearing one.
My outfit cost around $1,000 altogether. Onlookers didn’t care that my herringbone blazer cost around $600. Hell, even my socks were about $25. All that mattered was the cherry on top: a $22 bowtie.
But why is that? The bowtie has become a phenomenon we associate with tuxedos and soda jockeys. It’s now a symbol for a special event. Everybody wanted to know why I was “so dressed up” that day. I would usually respond with, “eh, ya know, just another day,” but only some would buy that. The rest looked at me like I was a lunatic.
Us young people aren’t used to seeing the casual bowtie. It’s just not something our generation associates with the everyday. The necktie is mainstream, and bowties seem old-fashioned. Who would think to wear one on a regular day?
Therein lies the power of a bowtie. It’s a secret I’d rather keep to myself.

The Power of a Bowtie

Recently I heard about a guy who wore a bowtie almost every single day of his college career. It was his trademark, and I wish I had thought of it first.

People are nicer to you if you’re wearing a bowtie. Plain and simple.

Wearing one for the first time the other day, sixty-one different individuals said something nice about my appearance. About a third of them were strangers. Most made a direct reference to my choice in neckware. But every single one of them greeted me with a big smile.

As I was leaving a building, a girl with rainbow hair caught my eye. I could tell she had been staring and when I turned to look at her, she grinned and called out, “Bowties are cool!” I didn’t know whether to thank her or agree so I just chuckled and dipped out the door.

While I was picking up a package, the woman behind the desk told me how much she liked my tie. She said, “it gave me personality.” I could have been the biggest asshole she’d ever met, but it didn’t matter – I was wearing a bowtie.

At one point I passed a plot where the skeleton of a building stood. From the metal girders where they sat with their lunches, a group of female construction workers sent a chorus of catcalls hurtling in my direction. One of them let out a long, old-fashioned whistle.

Okay, maybe that’s stretching the truth a bit. But the point is that bowties surround you with an aura that catches the eye of everyone nearby. For some reason, they all want to know why you’re wearing one.

My outfit cost around $1,000 altogether. Onlookers didn’t care that my herringbone blazer cost around $600. Hell, even my socks were about $25. All that mattered was the cherry on top: a $22 bowtie.

But why is that? The bowtie has become a phenomenon we associate with tuxedos and soda jockeys. It’s now a symbol for a special event. Everybody wanted to know why I was “so dressed up” that day. I would usually respond with, “eh, ya know, just another day,” but only some would buy that. The rest looked at me like I was a lunatic.

Us young people aren’t used to seeing the casual bowtie. It’s just not something our generation associates with the everyday. The necktie is mainstream, and bowties seem old-fashioned. Who would think to wear one on a regular day?

Therein lies the power of a bowtie. It’s a secret I’d rather keep to myself.